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I have no actual career to speak of. My laptop resides on the chair, while dirty plates reside on my desk. I sit on my bed and most of my stuff is permanently in boxes as I will be moving again. I buy books in poundshop or sometimes I find them on the sidewalk. I'm always a few years behind with what I'm supposed to be reading. I go from hermit phases when I try to leave the house as little as possible to party-binges. This book and I were just not a good match. It was just too neat. View all 32 comments. Nov 01, Richard Derus rated it it was ok. Rating: 2. Into this closed world comes An Rating: 2.

My Review : Two pairs of aging siblings, all damaged goods from various sorts of parental abuse and neglect, collide in one of France's most beautiful areas Nothing good comes of anyone's best-intentioned acts because no one has learned what good intentions look like. Tremain explores the results of repression and suppression to their logical extremes in this book. There are no new stories, only new ways of telling them. This isn't even a new way of telling an old, tired, and frankly quite offensive story.

I will not scruple from spoilers from this sentence forward. Stop reading now if you want, despite my urgent advice, to read this tiresome bilge. Audrun Lunel is a slow child, youngest of her family, and probably not the daughter of the man who raised and molested her, as she was born very shortly after the end of WWII and her mother was alone Her brother, at the very least her half-brother that is, molested her too, all after her saintly mama dies. This is a story I simply do not want to read again, ever, since I survived incestuous abuse by my mother and don't care to see the culturally acceptable image of men as abusers continue unchallenged.

Anthony Verey, English poofter and antiques dealer, is in thrall to his memories of his glammy mommy, Lavender, a South African transplant to England, and a woman without a maternal bone in her body. My mother was Southern, but that's a good description of her, too. His fat lesbian older sister comes in for most of the verbal abuse his mother can deal out same with my family , because the sister is not a fashion accessory child.

The sister works hard to protect little Anthony, and sets up a lifetime pattern of dependency. In the end, Anthony is shot by Audrun for being a rosbif carpetbagger, after which she frames her disgusting older brother for the crime. Creepy queerboy is dead, not before killing his sister's relationship to a perfectly nice if deadly dull woman, and nasty abuser boy goes to prison. Which is where I want to send these goddamned woman novelists who, when they are absent an idea, think it's perfectly okay to portray their fellow women as victimvictimvictim of horrible, slimy men.

No woman I know Each and every one of the women I know is strong and capable. I resent on their behalf the unquestioned rightness of this kind of claptrap built on the false dichotomy between male abuser and female abused.

Rotten stuff. View all 3 comments. The way Tremain is able to straddle various genres and themes—psychological fiction, mystery, crime, family drama, inheritance laws, art—and never pigeonhole herself also shows her immense skill, especially with the weight of all she juggles here and yet is able to render very quiet, very still, and almost claustrophobic, like a chamber play or a Bergman film.

View all 5 comments. Mar 04, Ellie rated it really liked it Shelves: british , fiction , family , ind-chalbks. Trespass by Rose Tremain is classic Tremain: beautifully written, poignant and painful. The focus is two sets of relationships and the cataclysmic intersection: a British brother and sister, both gay and successful and a French brother and sister, both darkly disturbed, wealthy by birth but unsuccessful with their lives.

These characters and their relationships are strongly developed. But one of the pleasures of the book are the number of subsidiary characters who are also fully developed and po Trespass by Rose Tremain is classic Tremain: beautifully written, poignant and painful. But one of the pleasures of the book are the number of subsidiary characters who are also fully developed and powerfully present in the story without distracting from the main story. In particular, the story of the child Melodie artfully frames the narrative. The characters in Trespass are vivid and sometimes downright awful but they are not cardboard figures that can be simply dismissed.

Even the children, including the bullied Melodie while being to me generally unlikable, show glimmers of beauty and potential to growth. Prison can be, in some ways at least, a place of growth and loss can both cripple and release, sometimes both at the same time. What I like best in Tremain's writing, aside from the beauty of her prose, is its dark complexity. Recommended: for all those who enjoy the exploration of the darker side of all of us, and of family and relationships with the tool of prose that is graceful and precise.

Summary: Not a "happy" book by any means but not a book that is a foreclosure of hope for humanity. Sep 17, Elaine rated it really liked it Shelves: Excellent atmospheric gothic with an undertone of real melancholy about blighted childhoods and the way they can haunt into adulthood. Tremain is an extraordinarily readable writer -- this is completely different than the other book of her's I've read the Road Home , except that both featured characters that suck you in, realized settings and smooth prose.

Here, Tremain takes on two pairs of 60 something siblings who couldn't be more different, Audrun and Aramon, French peasants living on the v Excellent atmospheric gothic with an undertone of real melancholy about blighted childhoods and the way they can haunt into adulthood. Here, Tremain takes on two pairs of 60 something siblings who couldn't be more different, Audrun and Aramon, French peasants living on the verge of dire poverty on their ancestral land in the south of France and dealing with a past that includes the War, collaboration, hunger, and factory work , and Anthony and Veronica, respectively gay and lesbian, upper-crust English newcomers to France, an antiques dealer and a garden designer.

In other words, Anthony and Veronica are the "gentrifying" other side of the looking glass to Aramon and Audrun's connection to their old house, old things, and cherished agricultural land. Although none of the characters the main characters also include Veronica's self-centered partner, Kitty, a bad landscape painter are likable -- indeed, some are quite repugnant -- all are well realized, and the story hurtles on, extremely readable without ever being facile. It has the gripping nature and several elements of a mystery or thriller, but it has a surprisingly touching ending that takes it quite out of genre fiction.

In atmospheric menace it reminded me a great deal of Highsmith. One of the best parts is the atmospheric role played by the rural South of France landscape -- the underbelly of this tourist heaven is on full display. Quite close to be being a 5. More Tremain on my list! Sep 11, Trish rated it it was amazing Shelves: fiction , literature , mysteries.

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Rose Tremain remains one of my favorite authors. There is nothing flashy or false about the way she slowly dissects the lives of others, picking at scabs and uncovering hurts; revealing truths many of us have spent a lifetime trying to articulate. In Trepass , her latest novel, a British man in his later years is murdered in the French countryside.

Tremain shows us, in her slow, graceful prose, how this may be the best possible outcome--for the man, and for his murderer. Perhaps what I like best Rose Tremain remains one of my favorite authors. Perhaps what I like best about Rose Tremain is the fearless way she puts her finger on the pulse of a story, and proceeds, with few extra words, to describe a world--a world we may not be familiar with, but peopled by those we know. We know them because they are us. She is not cruel, but she is unblinking.

She sees, and she tells. She is sophisticated, and witty. Her prose is clear, uncluttered, and extraordinarily descriptive. She writes literature. View 2 comments. Like a Patricia Highsmith novel, but without the skin-crawling sensations or capri pants. A masterfully told story. Beautiful descriptive language. Dark and disturbing subject matter. Deep with symbolism. I am amazed by this author's control and fearlessness. Nov 22, TheGirlBytheSeaofCortez rated it really liked it Shelves: literary-fiction , booker-nominees-and-winners , contemporary-authors , english-literature-today.

While Audrun and Aramon are more or less estranged, Veronica and Anthony have remained very close. His deceased father, Serge, left him a wonderful stone mas, the Mas Lunel, which Aramon hopes to sell to Anthony for , euros. Audrun, who steadfastly refuses to rebuild deeper in the forest, out of sight of the Mas Lunel, alienates Anthony, Aramon, and all the local estate agents, who feel they cannot sell the Mas Lunel until the dispute between brother and sister is settled.

Although the Mas Lunel can definitely be restored to its former idyllic beauty, Aramon has not kept it up. Tremain writes, " Diseases came to the trees. The vine terraces crumbled. The rivers silted up. And nobody seemed to notice or care. He only cares about getting out. He has no love for the Mas Lunel or the land around it. In fact, possessing the mas is the one thing that keeps Audrun going from day-to-day. As would be expected, all of the main characters in Trespass have either trespassed on the rights of others or are planning to do so. Kitty, who realizes that the deep bond between Anthony and Veronica was formed long before she and Veronica even met struggles with the once carefree relationship she and her lover shared, a relationship that is now facing destruction from outside forces.

Though they both adored their mother, Bernadette, their father was abusive, and he encouraged Aramon to follow his example. Both brother and sister struggle to come to terms with their poisoned past, though they struggle in different ways. The woods of holm oak and beech and chestnut and pine are lovely, but Tremain never lets us forget that its loveliness is fraught with danger.

They seem either blind to their faults or dismissive of them. But they did seem real. They were one hundred percent believable and so is their story. The reference is distracting. Her characters are in search of redemption from their trespasses, and some of them are more active about pursuing that redemption than others. Is it worth it? Well, Tremain wisely leaves that for her readers to decide. View all 6 comments. I so wanted to like this book. It sounded so promising. The first chapter was really very good and I was looking forward to the "frightening and unstoppable series of consequences" mentioned on the back of my paperback copy.

Sadly, by the time we got to that point, I was totally and completely disenchanted by every single one of the characters including the isolated stone farmhouse in southern France, which is a bit of a character in itself I am not going to go into a summary of the story because you can get that from the other reviewers. What I will say is that Rose Tremain has a lovely way with words. Some of them were so beautiful that I found myself reading them several times before moving on: "They both knew it was borrowed: the view of hills; even the sunsets and the clarity of the stars.

Somewhere they knew it didn't belong to them.


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Because if you left your own country, if you left it late, and made your home in someone else's country, there was always a feeling that you were breaking an invisible law, always the irrational fear that, one day, some 'rightful owner' would arrive to take it all away, and you would be driven out Unfortunately, I just couldn't find any redeeming qualities in the characters and therefore, couldn't have cared less what happened to them. Frankly, if the book had been any longer, I would have lost the will to live and wouldn't have finished it.

Needless to say, I found myself quite relieved when it was over. However, the use of language was lovely and I did find myself completely seduced by it at times Okay I can't rate this novel I love the way Rose Tremain writes, her words and sentences. I was really liking the story until there was a scene I could nt get past, not sure this needed to be so graphically out there. Anyway it ruined the bok for me. Guess I'm just too much of a prude. See more of my book reviews on my blog, Literary Flits I absolutely loved Rose Tremain's historical fiction novel The Colour when I read it three years ago.

She's an author whose I have meant to read more of and finally got around to this week. Trespass, for me, didn't have the immersive power of The Colour, but is still a very well written novel with an intriguing mystery at its heart. It is set in southern France, an area that Tremain knows well, and her expertise comes across in the writing. I loved her evocation of the lonely rural community and the ties of local people to the land they have farmed in the same way for generations.

The strained relationship between siblings Audrun and Aramon Lunel - and the dark reason for this - is beautifully portrayed and I think I would have been much happier with Trespass had Tremain focused on this French story. Instead the novel is split between the Lunels and a rich English brother and sister, Veronica and Anthony Verey, one of whom is already living in France and the other who decides to emigrate nearby - possibly to Mas Lunel.

Anthony Verey feels wearyingly sorry for himself for most of the book and not only did I not like his character, I found his perpetual whinging spoilt the rest of this story for me as well. He used to be rich and famous within his nartow Chelsea art clique. Now he isn't but he still has a lot more than most people so my empathy with his 'poor me' routine was pretty much zero throughout - I'd love to be able to just buy a French farmhouse on a whim!

Both sisters have to take responsibility for their brothers, practically parenting them much of the time, which was interesting as the males still insisted on seeing themselves as being in charge. Women in Trespass are strong, but are treated as weak for the sake of pride which is something that rang very true from my family.

I'm glad to have read Trespass and currently have two more borrowed Rose Tremain books awaiting me so I look forward to reading them soon. I don't know exactly what to expect as Tremain writes her stories in different settings and eras. Sep 19, Bev Taylor rated it really liked it. Feb 28, Bonnie Brody rated it it was amazing. Rose Tremain is not only a prolific writer, but she is a great one. Each of her novels is different in theme, tenor, and topic. Trespass, her most recent book, is a dark, eerie and grim themed novel with a definite gothic undertone.

Set in the southern part of France, in an area known as the Cevennes region, the land itself is portrayed as something feral and alive, so filled with lush growth, insects, snakes and sounds, that it has a life of its own. In this region live a sister and brother, Aud Rose Tremain is not only a prolific writer, but she is a great one.

In this region live a sister and brother, Audrun and Aramon Lunel. Aramon lives in the family home, Mas Lunel, that he inherited from his father. Audrun lives in a small bungalow in sight of Mas Lunel. Aramon is a misanthropic, mean-spirited drunk who has let his home go to ruin. It stinks, the olive groves are overgrown, and the hunting dogs are starving to death.

Audrun hates her brother for reasons that are divulged towards the middle of the book. She inherited some land from her father and she loves to walk on it. In her bungalow, she feels like an outcast, seeing few people and staying very much to herself. Her only peace comes from her home and land. One day as she is doing her daily walk on her land, she sees Arumel stealing some of her saplings and fallen brush. Feelings of hate roil up in her but she lets him take the wood with her permission.

In another part of the valley live Veronica and her life partner Kitty in a home called Les Glaniques. They are totally and passionately in love. Veronica is originally from England and is very close with her brother, Anthony Verey, who still resides there. Anthony is a narcissistic antiques dealer. He was once the talk of the town, invited to every party and known by everybody worth knowing.

With the downturn in the economy, Anthony is facing an existential crisis. Where once he could fall asleep by counting all those who envied him, he now is selling very little and invited places very infrequently. He and his sister, Veronica, have always been very close though he does not like Kitty. He decides to visit Veronica and stay for an indeterminate length of time. Though Veronica is thrilled about this visit, Kitty has reservations. Once Anthony gets to his sister's, he falls in love with the region and decides that he wants to purchase a home in the Cevennes region.

Interestingly, he wants to buy Mas Lunel.

Dynamic Discs Lucid Trespass

He still has a lot of money and can spend , Euros on this home. Only one thing bothers him - Audrun's bungalow is visible from the estate and he finds it an eyesore. Aramon, with dollar signs in his eyes, tells Anthony that he believes the bungalow is built illegally on his land and that he will get a surveyor to prove it. Then they will be able to tear it down. A series of events begins that set into motion acts that have irreparable results.

While staying with Veronica and Kitty, Anthony does his best to intervene in their relationship, trying to drive a rift between them. They become afraid to share their feelings and passion as they once did, suspicious that Anthony is on the other side of the door or the wall listening to them. Once like one, they grow further and further apart. Trespass is a powerful word and in this novel we see it used in all its meanings. There is the basic trespassing on land, people trespassing on other lives and ignoring boundaries, the cultural implications of trespassing on the land of another culture, and the trespassing on honor and truth.

Throughout the book, there is a darkness, a grim forboding of things to come. In some ways, this reminded me of the best of Joyce Carol Oates, and the way Oates portrays the darkness of characters and the dangers lurking in the ordinary day to day world. Tremain's characters are rich. They come alive for us and we flinch at the darkness within their souls along with the pain within their hearts. She is a fine writer and this is one of her best books to date. Oct 08, LitAddictedBrit rated it liked it Shelves: read , read-but-unowned. My mum bought this book and read it first. We often share books and in the vast majority of cases her thoughts on how much I'll enjoy it are spot on.

So when she handed me Trespass and said, "I'll be interested to see what you think Usually, it's something along the lines of "Read this, you'll love it! So I kind of felt like I was being experimented on before I even started I've obviously heard of Tremain before, if only because I've not My mum bought this book and read it first. I've obviously heard of Tremain before, if only because I've noticed a sizeable line of her books in a book shop every now and then. I knew about the volume of work but I couldn't have told you anything about the subject matter.

Onto that subject matter Audrun and Aramon Lunel are brother and sister that are destroying each other.

Perhaps even have already succeeded. They live almost in utter isolation at the Mas Lunel and their proximity torments each of them daily. I really felt for Audrun as a woman struggling with an unimaginable burden but was slightly repelled by her twisted focus. Equally, Aramon is a sorry man drinking himself into oblivion but, again, I found his history abhorrent and almost couldn't bear to read about his sordid view of the world.

Anthony Verey is struggling in obscurity; running an antique shop with very few customers and a shadow of the former famous man he once was. He no longer connects with people and identifies only with the objects under his care: his "beloveds", as he calls them. In his youth, Anthony was a respected valuer and noted expert - in his own mind, he is still the Anthony Verey. Needless to say, he is tormented and all but broken and looks to his older sister to save him. Veronica Verey lives in France and has an overly-maternal attitude towards Anthony. Her partner, Kitty, is somewhat less enthused.

The problem I had with 'V' is an almost complete disregard for anyone other than the Verey family. She claims to love Kitty but when Anthony arrives and starts taking over their lives, V turns her back on Kitty with an utter disregard for the pain she is causing. That said, I couldn't find it in myself to feel too bad for Kitty because her hatred for Anthony seems solely borne out of jealousy and she has such a lack of personal identity that I found myself just willing her to stand up for herself! As you can see, this is a book that is all about its characters, these five predominantly.

I believe that one of my texts to my mum when I was about half way through read "What is up with the people in this book?! I wouldn't want to know any of them and I certainly wouldn't want to intrude on their painful world but they are disturbingly captivating. The story, equally, isn't an easy one to read. View 2 comments. Like a Patricia Highsmith novel, but without the skin-crawling sensations or capri pants. A masterfully told story. Beautiful descriptive language. Dark and disturbing subject matter. Deep with symbolism. I am amazed by this author's control and fearlessness.

Nov 22, TheGirlBytheSeaofCortez rated it really liked it Shelves: literary-fiction , booker-nominees-and-winners , contemporary-authors , english-literature-today. While Audrun and Aramon are more or less estranged, Veronica and Anthony have remained very close. His deceased father, Serge, left him a wonderful stone mas, the Mas Lunel, which Aramon hopes to sell to Anthony for , euros. Audrun, who steadfastly refuses to rebuild deeper in the forest, out of sight of the Mas Lunel, alienates Anthony, Aramon, and all the local estate agents, who feel they cannot sell the Mas Lunel until the dispute between brother and sister is settled.

Although the Mas Lunel can definitely be restored to its former idyllic beauty, Aramon has not kept it up. Tremain writes, " Diseases came to the trees. The vine terraces crumbled. The rivers silted up. And nobody seemed to notice or care. He only cares about getting out. He has no love for the Mas Lunel or the land around it. In fact, possessing the mas is the one thing that keeps Audrun going from day-to-day. As would be expected, all of the main characters in Trespass have either trespassed on the rights of others or are planning to do so. Kitty, who realizes that the deep bond between Anthony and Veronica was formed long before she and Veronica even met struggles with the once carefree relationship she and her lover shared, a relationship that is now facing destruction from outside forces.

Though they both adored their mother, Bernadette, their father was abusive, and he encouraged Aramon to follow his example. Both brother and sister struggle to come to terms with their poisoned past, though they struggle in different ways. The woods of holm oak and beech and chestnut and pine are lovely, but Tremain never lets us forget that its loveliness is fraught with danger.

Trespassing

They seem either blind to their faults or dismissive of them. But they did seem real. They were one hundred percent believable and so is their story. The reference is distracting. Her characters are in search of redemption from their trespasses, and some of them are more active about pursuing that redemption than others. Is it worth it? Well, Tremain wisely leaves that for her readers to decide.

View all 6 comments. I so wanted to like this book. It sounded so promising. The first chapter was really very good and I was looking forward to the "frightening and unstoppable series of consequences" mentioned on the back of my paperback copy. Sadly, by the time we got to that point, I was totally and completely disenchanted by every single one of the characters including the isolated stone farmhouse in southern France, which is a bit of a character in itself I am not going to go into a summary of the story because you can get that from the other reviewers.

What I will say is that Rose Tremain has a lovely way with words. Some of them were so beautiful that I found myself reading them several times before moving on: "They both knew it was borrowed: the view of hills; even the sunsets and the clarity of the stars. Somewhere they knew it didn't belong to them. Because if you left your own country, if you left it late, and made your home in someone else's country, there was always a feeling that you were breaking an invisible law, always the irrational fear that, one day, some 'rightful owner' would arrive to take it all away, and you would be driven out Unfortunately, I just couldn't find any redeeming qualities in the characters and therefore, couldn't have cared less what happened to them.

Frankly, if the book had been any longer, I would have lost the will to live and wouldn't have finished it. Needless to say, I found myself quite relieved when it was over. However, the use of language was lovely and I did find myself completely seduced by it at times Okay I can't rate this novel I love the way Rose Tremain writes, her words and sentences. I was really liking the story until there was a scene I could nt get past, not sure this needed to be so graphically out there. Anyway it ruined the bok for me. Guess I'm just too much of a prude. See more of my book reviews on my blog, Literary Flits I absolutely loved Rose Tremain's historical fiction novel The Colour when I read it three years ago.

She's an author whose I have meant to read more of and finally got around to this week. Trespass, for me, didn't have the immersive power of The Colour, but is still a very well written novel with an intriguing mystery at its heart. It is set in southern France, an area that Tremain knows well, and her expertise comes across in the writing. I loved her evocation of the lonely rural community and the ties of local people to the land they have farmed in the same way for generations. The strained relationship between siblings Audrun and Aramon Lunel - and the dark reason for this - is beautifully portrayed and I think I would have been much happier with Trespass had Tremain focused on this French story.

Instead the novel is split between the Lunels and a rich English brother and sister, Veronica and Anthony Verey, one of whom is already living in France and the other who decides to emigrate nearby - possibly to Mas Lunel. Anthony Verey feels wearyingly sorry for himself for most of the book and not only did I not like his character, I found his perpetual whinging spoilt the rest of this story for me as well. He used to be rich and famous within his nartow Chelsea art clique.

Now he isn't but he still has a lot more than most people so my empathy with his 'poor me' routine was pretty much zero throughout - I'd love to be able to just buy a French farmhouse on a whim!


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Both sisters have to take responsibility for their brothers, practically parenting them much of the time, which was interesting as the males still insisted on seeing themselves as being in charge. Women in Trespass are strong, but are treated as weak for the sake of pride which is something that rang very true from my family.

I'm glad to have read Trespass and currently have two more borrowed Rose Tremain books awaiting me so I look forward to reading them soon. I don't know exactly what to expect as Tremain writes her stories in different settings and eras. Sep 19, Bev Taylor rated it really liked it. Feb 28, Bonnie Brody rated it it was amazing. Rose Tremain is not only a prolific writer, but she is a great one. Each of her novels is different in theme, tenor, and topic. Trespass, her most recent book, is a dark, eerie and grim themed novel with a definite gothic undertone.

Set in the southern part of France, in an area known as the Cevennes region, the land itself is portrayed as something feral and alive, so filled with lush growth, insects, snakes and sounds, that it has a life of its own. In this region live a sister and brother, Aud Rose Tremain is not only a prolific writer, but she is a great one.

Trespass Information

In this region live a sister and brother, Audrun and Aramon Lunel. Aramon lives in the family home, Mas Lunel, that he inherited from his father. Audrun lives in a small bungalow in sight of Mas Lunel. Aramon is a misanthropic, mean-spirited drunk who has let his home go to ruin. It stinks, the olive groves are overgrown, and the hunting dogs are starving to death. Audrun hates her brother for reasons that are divulged towards the middle of the book. She inherited some land from her father and she loves to walk on it.

In her bungalow, she feels like an outcast, seeing few people and staying very much to herself. Her only peace comes from her home and land. One day as she is doing her daily walk on her land, she sees Arumel stealing some of her saplings and fallen brush. Feelings of hate roil up in her but she lets him take the wood with her permission.

In another part of the valley live Veronica and her life partner Kitty in a home called Les Glaniques. They are totally and passionately in love. Veronica is originally from England and is very close with her brother, Anthony Verey, who still resides there. Anthony is a narcissistic antiques dealer.

He was once the talk of the town, invited to every party and known by everybody worth knowing. With the downturn in the economy, Anthony is facing an existential crisis. Where once he could fall asleep by counting all those who envied him, he now is selling very little and invited places very infrequently. He and his sister, Veronica, have always been very close though he does not like Kitty. He decides to visit Veronica and stay for an indeterminate length of time. Though Veronica is thrilled about this visit, Kitty has reservations.

Once Anthony gets to his sister's, he falls in love with the region and decides that he wants to purchase a home in the Cevennes region. Interestingly, he wants to buy Mas Lunel. He still has a lot of money and can spend , Euros on this home. Only one thing bothers him - Audrun's bungalow is visible from the estate and he finds it an eyesore.

Aramon, with dollar signs in his eyes, tells Anthony that he believes the bungalow is built illegally on his land and that he will get a surveyor to prove it. Then they will be able to tear it down. A series of events begins that set into motion acts that have irreparable results. While staying with Veronica and Kitty, Anthony does his best to intervene in their relationship, trying to drive a rift between them.

They become afraid to share their feelings and passion as they once did, suspicious that Anthony is on the other side of the door or the wall listening to them. Once like one, they grow further and further apart. Trespass is a powerful word and in this novel we see it used in all its meanings. There is the basic trespassing on land, people trespassing on other lives and ignoring boundaries, the cultural implications of trespassing on the land of another culture, and the trespassing on honor and truth.

Throughout the book, there is a darkness, a grim forboding of things to come. In some ways, this reminded me of the best of Joyce Carol Oates, and the way Oates portrays the darkness of characters and the dangers lurking in the ordinary day to day world. Tremain's characters are rich. They come alive for us and we flinch at the darkness within their souls along with the pain within their hearts. She is a fine writer and this is one of her best books to date. Oct 08, LitAddictedBrit rated it liked it Shelves: read , read-but-unowned. My mum bought this book and read it first. We often share books and in the vast majority of cases her thoughts on how much I'll enjoy it are spot on.

So when she handed me Trespass and said, "I'll be interested to see what you think Usually, it's something along the lines of "Read this, you'll love it! So I kind of felt like I was being experimented on before I even started I've obviously heard of Tremain before, if only because I've not My mum bought this book and read it first. I've obviously heard of Tremain before, if only because I've noticed a sizeable line of her books in a book shop every now and then.

I knew about the volume of work but I couldn't have told you anything about the subject matter. Onto that subject matter Audrun and Aramon Lunel are brother and sister that are destroying each other. Perhaps even have already succeeded. They live almost in utter isolation at the Mas Lunel and their proximity torments each of them daily. I really felt for Audrun as a woman struggling with an unimaginable burden but was slightly repelled by her twisted focus. Equally, Aramon is a sorry man drinking himself into oblivion but, again, I found his history abhorrent and almost couldn't bear to read about his sordid view of the world.

Anthony Verey is struggling in obscurity; running an antique shop with very few customers and a shadow of the former famous man he once was.


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He no longer connects with people and identifies only with the objects under his care: his "beloveds", as he calls them. In his youth, Anthony was a respected valuer and noted expert - in his own mind, he is still the Anthony Verey. Needless to say, he is tormented and all but broken and looks to his older sister to save him. Veronica Verey lives in France and has an overly-maternal attitude towards Anthony. Her partner, Kitty, is somewhat less enthused. The problem I had with 'V' is an almost complete disregard for anyone other than the Verey family.

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She claims to love Kitty but when Anthony arrives and starts taking over their lives, V turns her back on Kitty with an utter disregard for the pain she is causing. That said, I couldn't find it in myself to feel too bad for Kitty because her hatred for Anthony seems solely borne out of jealousy and she has such a lack of personal identity that I found myself just willing her to stand up for herself!

As you can see, this is a book that is all about its characters, these five predominantly. I believe that one of my texts to my mum when I was about half way through read "What is up with the people in this book?! I wouldn't want to know any of them and I certainly wouldn't want to intrude on their painful world but they are disturbingly captivating. The story, equally, isn't an easy one to read.

The subject matter can be tough and the relationships are destructive and harrowing. My A-Level English Literature teacher loved a bit of pathetic fallacy and I suppose it's ingrained in my psyche somewhere that I should be looking out for it. This book has it in spades. As the heat builds in the story, so it builds in the Mas Lunel and the surrounding area. It was that that kept me reading. It might not always be pleasant but it is certainly compelling. I'm not exactly clamouring to read more of Tremain's writing straight away - I'm pretty sure my perception of humanity has been damaged enough for this month!

However, I'm not completely put off and would possibly pick up another in the future. A mixed reaction, I suppose. Overall: This is a strange book with some tough subject matter but the tension is engineered brilliantly and the story is a blend of heartache, memories and, of course, trespass. Trespass - of land by foreigners and by one's own family members; of one's own personal body and personal space; of intruders into one's relationships.

Trespass is the underlying theme of this novel. How this violation is dealt with by the various characters makes up the story line and the inevitable conflict that is at the core of any good story. In the south of France is the mountainous region of the Cevennes. This is not a pretty postcard area of France, but one of rugged, mountains, full of Trespass - of land by foreigners and by one's own family members; of one's own personal body and personal space; of intruders into one's relationships.

This is not a pretty postcard area of France, but one of rugged, mountains, full of valleys, rivers and forests with tortuous roads made famous by a journey Robert Louis Stevenson took on a donkey over 12 days and kms. This sinister and dark environment is captured perfectly as the backdrop for the sinister and dark goings-on in this novel which centres on two sets of brother and sister, one set French, born and bred in the Cevennes; and the other English, relatively new arrivals to the area.

Aramon and Audrun are, I guess, in their late fifties or early sixties. They live on a family property, the brother in the dilapidated large house, the sister in a new bungalow on her portion of the land. The brother, like the house, is falling apart through personal neglect and the sister is biding her time until he completely falls apart. He is desperate to sell the property to the numerous English, Dutch and Germans eager to buy in the area, but the presence of his sister's house on what he considers is his land has prevented any sales to date.

Meanwhile not far away, Veronica Verey, a successful garden designer and aspiring writer, who is of a similar age, lives with her lover Kitty, a very average artist. Into this mix arrives Anthony Verey, an extremely successful antique dealer from London, who is beginning to find he is a bit of a has-been, and is looking for fresh pastures. His arrival sets in place a chain of events that result in death and destruction. The writing is marvellous: suspenseful, descriptive, dramatic, all the while taking place in the dangerous and rugged terrain of the area, its secret forests, valleys and glades.

The characters are fabulously vivid, I can picture exactly how they look, what they wear, how they move, their little behaviours and idiosyncrasies. Like peeling the proverbial onion, very gradually the author uncovers the background and secrets to the relationships between the two sets of brothers and sisters which sets the scene for how events unfold. A first rate story, that is just a little bit scary and so remains with you for quite some after. And it is not the characters and the events which are scary but the fabulous landscape and scenery which stays with the reader!

Next trip to France It says in the blurb "From the moment he Anthony Verey arrives at the Mas Lunel, a frightening and unstoppable series of consequences is set in motion The first few chapters were very confusing, a different character in every chapter Jodi Piccoult style but Jodi Piccoult does it much better, it has only just become apparent how these characters are connected in the 11th chapter and I'm still wondering where Melodie the little girl in the fi It says in the blurb "From the moment he Anthony Verey arrives at the Mas Lunel, a frightening and unstoppable series of consequences is set in motion The first few chapters were very confusing, a different character in every chapter Jodi Piccoult style but Jodi Piccoult does it much better, it has only just become apparent how these characters are connected in the 11th chapter and I'm still wondering where Melodie the little girl in the first chapter fits in.

It's not helping me that the characters are all of retirement age, I cannot empathise with them, hoping it get's better soon, if I'd not paid good money for this book I'd have given up on it by now. Page Buy the house already!!!! I really should give up on this book, all the characters are horrid, I feel as though since I've wasted so much effort on this book I should finish it but she doesn't half like to ramble on about inconsequential rubbish, do I really care about why Anthony chooses a certain sandwich???

In fact I don't care about anything any longer, I just wish she'd get to the point. I finally finished the book, it didn't really get any better, I'm just pleased I can get onto something else I might enjoy. If anyone wants to read it, please take it off my hands, just don't bring it back!

View 1 comment. Jun 08, Giedre rated it liked it Shelves: liked-but-couldn-t-love , booker-longlist , british , lgbt , crime , trauma , 21st-century , s , mental-illness. The plot of the book revolves around two families, British Vereys and French Lunels. Both of the families are composed of a brother and a sister, and t "Trespass" was my first Tremain's book, and I chose to read it almost accidentally, as I could not remember the context in which it ended up in my e-reader. Both of the families are composed of a brother and a sister, and through their intertwined stories Tremain analyses complicated relationships with their mothers and fathers, childhood traumas and their effect on the current lives of the characters.

I do love dark and complicated stories and deep psychological analysis of the characters and their flaws in literature, but I must admit that there was too much of darkness even for me in this one. I wouldn't read this book again because of the feelings it evoked in me, but it left me wishing to open another book of Tremain's very soon.

View all 4 comments. Aug 03, Kats rated it really liked it Recommended to Kats by: simon savidge. Shelves: audio , family , british , kcls-audio , contemporary , the-readers-recommendation , mystery , My aunty has recommended Rose Tremain's books to me so many times and gave me a copy of Sacred Country years ago when I was still at university.

Well, it took Simon Savidge's late Gran to get me reading a Tremain, and I certainly can see why she is a highly rated writer. Though the mysteries that unravelled weren't all that mysterious to me at all I must have a sick mind because I always think the worst of characters in books and what sinister acts they may have committed in the past I'd highly recommend this for people with a foible for dark family drama interspersed with astute and witty observations and descriptions of Chelsea toffs and their ilk.

Thanks to my dear friend Jana, I was able to enjoy this book on audio, read by the fantastic actress Juliet Stephenson who is fast becoming one of my favourite audio book narrators. Lots of people liked this book. It is hard for me to rate because it was well written and Ms. Tremain has a tremendous reputation. But the characters, even the ones we were meant to be sympathetic toward, were just so very unlikable.

From the antiques dealer to Adrun. Even the child who was really a minor character was unlikable. Horrible things happening to horrible people. Were they that way because of their upbringing; in the end I couldn't bring myself to care. I was cringing through a great Lots of people liked this book.

I was cringing through a great deal of the book, forcing myself to continue because I just couldn't believe that there would be no glimmer of redemption. Nov 13, Sue rated it really liked it Shelves: mystery , library-book , france , read-in I enjoyed reading this novel set in France with English ex-patriots and locals as primary characters. It combines character study of damaged individuals with a mystery and was a story that I really wanted to read and know the outcome.

This is a new author and setting for me. I believe I will try more of Tremain's books. Dec 28, Cherise Wolas rated it it was amazing Shelves: reading-challenge , literary , atmospheric , fiction , literary-i-loved , uk-writers , outstanding. Complex, dark, gorgeously written. Though published in , and though I've read many wonderful books this year, this is the novel of my year. Sep 14, Felice rated it really liked it. For the most part I am a live and let live reader. If you can barely wait the 20 minutes it takes for the next James Patterson to appear that's okay with me.

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